How to Make Bevel Cuts on a Table Saw [Any Angle]

How to Make Bevel Cuts on a Table Saw [Any Angle]

How to Make Bevel Cuts on a Table Saw [Any Angle]

A bevel cut refers to a cut with sharp edges that are not perpendicular to the top of the wood or material.

Although bevel cut can be made with almost all types of saws such as jigsaw, circular saw and miter saw, etc, the preferred and possibly easiest method is by using a table saw.

A properly calibrated table saw fitted with a sharp blade can guarantee a precise clean cut at any given angle. Let me show you how.

Things You'll Need

  • Table Saw Blade with a riving knife
  • Wood
  • Digital Angle Box (optional)

The method for bevel cutting on the table saw differs based on whether the bevel angle is greater or lesser than 45°.

In this guide, I'll show you how to make the bevel cut in both cases:

Bevel Cut on Table Saw with Angle more than 45 degree

As an example, I'll show you how to make a 50-degree bevel cut on wood.

First, place the wood to be cut on the work table.

wood to be bevel cut
wood to be bevel cut

Because the angle you wish to cut is greater than 45 degrees, and the maximum angle for to which a table saw blade can be tilted is 45 degrees, you'll need a different approach.

To begin, subtract the required angle from 90.

It will be 40 degrees in this example. (90 minus 50)

Set the angle of the table saw blade to 40 degrees.

The table saw's bevel indicator isn't to be trusted.

Although the bevel indicator was designed for precision, years of handling sawdust, grit, and debris eventually clog the interior, resulting in incorrect cuts.

Using a digital angle box or an adjustable bevel gauge and a protractor to set up your bevel angle is a preferable option.

If neither of these options is available, miter cut a 50-degree scrap piece and use it as reference to set the bevel angle.

If your bevel angle indicator is accurate, you can skip the section below and move straight to the bevel cut part.

Making a Angled Wood Piece for Adjusting the Table Saw's Angle

Set the miter gauge to a 50-degree angle and cut a miter on a scrap piece of wood.

setting the miter angle to 50 degrees
setting the miter angle to 50 degrees

You can now use this piece of wood to set the blade's angle.

The blade will be positioned at 40 degrees from the vertical since the angle on the scrap piece of wood is 50 degrees.

setting the bevel angle of the table saw blade using the mitered piece
setting the bevel angle of the table saw blade using the mitered piece

Making the Bevel Cut on Table Saw

It's time to do the bevel cut after you've set the angle of the saw blade correctly.

To create the 50-degree bevel cut, we'll hold the wood vertically.

Because cutting a single piece of wood vertically is tough, you'll need to attach it to another scrap piece of wood to give it more heft.

Take a scrap piece of wood for this. It doesn't matter how thick it is as long as it is tall.

The scrap wood will function as a push block, assisting in the cutting of the bevel and support the timber to be cut.

piece of scrap wood for supporting the wood to be bevel cut
piece of scrap wood for supporting the wood to be bevel cut

Adjust the rip fence such that the distance between the fence and the blade is equal to the thickness of the scrap wood.

This ensures that the blade will begin cutting at the edge of the wood to be bevel cut, without touching the scrap wood.

setting the rip fence for making the bevel cut
setting the rip fence for making the bevel cut

Attach the wood to bevel cut onto the face of the scrap wood using screws or brad nails.

If you don't want to use screws, you can use masking tape and wrap around both pieces.

But it's safer to use screws.

attaching the scrap wood to the wood to be bevel cut
attaching the scrap wood to the wood to be bevel cut

Start cutting by turning on the saw and pushing the combination into the blade.

Make sure the scrap wood is pressed firmly against the fence.

bevel cutting at 50 degrees on the table saw
bevel cutting at 50 degrees on the table saw

The scrap wood will come out at the other end unscathed and the wood will be cut with a 50-degree bevel.

bevel cut of 50 degrees completed using table saw
bevel cut of 50 degrees completed using table saw

With that, you have successfully completed a 50-degree bevel cut on a table saw.

Bevel Cut on Table Saw with Angle Less than 45 degree

As an example, I'll show you how to make a 40-degree bevel cut on wood.

Start by placing the wood to be cut onto the work surface.

wood to be bevel cut
wood to be bevel cut

To make a bevel cut, the blade angle must be tilted to 40 degrees from the vertical.

Instead of trusting the bevel angle indicator, you can miter cut a wood piece with a 50-degree angle (90-40) to set the bevel angle of the table saw.

If your bevel angle indicator is accurate, you can skip the section below and move straight to the bevel cut part.

Making an Angled Wood Piece for Adjusting the Table Saw's Angle

To make this piece, set the angle on the miter gauge to 50 degrees and lock the angle in place.

setting the miter angle to 50 degrees
setting the miter angle to 50 degrees

Cut the scrap wood at a 50-degree miter using the miter gauge.

miter cutting at 50 degrees using the miter gauge
miter cutting at 50 degrees using the miter gauge

Now this 50-degree piece can be used to set the bevel angle on the table saw blade.

setting the bevel angle of the blade using the mitered piece as reference
setting the bevel angle of the blade using the mitered piece as a reference

Making the Bevel Cut on Table Saw

Once the angle is set, you're ready to make the cut on the actual piece of wood you intend to use.

Set the miter gauge on the saw and make sure the angle is set back to 90 degrees.

miter angle set to 90 degree
miter angle set to 90 degree

One the wood piece, mark the point at which you intend to make the bevel cut.

Align the table saw blade with the point which you just marked and do not move it afterward.

Turn on the saw and let it reach full speed, then slowly begin feeding the wood into the saw blade.

bevel cutting using table saw (less than 45 degrees)
bevel cutting using a table saw (less than 45 degrees)

Make sure to grasp the miter gauge and the wood firmly together.

Make sure to keep the rip fence far away to prevent kickback from the offcut.

Once the cut is finished, make sure the edges are clean and free of splinters.

If there are any rough edges, sand them out and make it smooth.

sanding the edges to finish the bevel cut
sanding the edges to finish the bevel cut

With that, your 40-degree angle bevel cut is successfully made using a table saw.

bevel cut of 40 degree angle completed using table saw
bevel cut of 40-degree angle completed using a table saw

Tips for Safety

  • When using a table saw, You should not use gloves. In addition, remove any rings, bracelets, or other clothing that might become entangled in the table saw or material.
  • Never stay right behind or too close to the running blade to avoid injury in case of kickback. Kickback is extremely dangerous and must be prevented at all costs.
  • Never lift the saw blade above the material being cut by more than 1/4th inches.
  • Make sure the saw teeth are facing in the right direction of rotation. (Clockwise direction in case of table saw).

Tips for Accuracy

  • If the length of the edge that is against the fence is shorter than the distance between the fence and the blade, Then dont cut it with the help of rip fence.
  • Miter gauge of the table saw can help create perfectly square cuts as its parallel to the blade as well as perpendicular. This is a much better alternative than using hands to push the wood.

About V Susan

Hi! I'm Susan. I am passionate about DIY projects and dark chocolates! Welcome to Mellowpine. We play around with beginner woodworking projects, CNC for hobbyists, and general woodworking tips.

If you'd like to connect with me or talk about something you like at mellowpine, drop me a mail at susan@mellowpine.com

DIY Profile
V Susan

Hi! I'm Susan. I am passionate about DIY projects and dark chocolates! Welcome to Mellowpine. We play around with beginner woodworking projects, CNC for hobbyists, and general woodworking tips.

If you'd like to connect with me or talk about something you like at mellowpine, drop me a mail at susan@mellowpine.com

Connect With Me
Thanks for signing up.
Some error occured. Please try again.

Comments

Add Your Comment